[PDF] ↠ The Seagull Author Anton Chekhov – Truongnguyenwedding.com


The Seagull A Methuen Student Edition Of Chekhov S Classic Play In Michael Frayn S Acclaimed TranslationWhen It Opened In St Petersburg In , The Seagull Survived Only Five Performances After A Disastrous First Night Two Years Later It Was Revived By Nemirovich Danchenko At The Newly Founded Moscow Art Theatre With Stanslasky As Trigorin And Was An Immediate Success Checkhov S Description Of The Play Was Characteristically Self Mocking A Comedy F, M, Four Acts, Rural Scenery A View Over A Lake Much Talk Of Literature, Little Action, Five Bushels Of LoveMichael Frayn S Translation Was Commissioned By The Oxford Playhouse Company

  • Paperback
  • 65 pages
  • The Seagull
  • Anton Chekhov
  • English
  • 11 October 2019
  • 0413771008

About the Author: Anton Chekhov

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Seagull book, this is one of the most wanted Anton Chekhov author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Seagull

  1. says:

    My first play of Chekhov..After reading it peacefully on my library desk I am going to watch it tonight I ll try to write my opinion on it Review After my reading of his stories, some of my GR friends had suggested me to try his plays I earnestly obeyed them with this first play of Chekhov I found once again very similar beauty and charm in it, which had made me his instant admirer, when I d first gone through his wonderful stories There are four main characters in this pla My first play of Chekhov..After reading it peacefully on my library desk I am going to watch it tonight I ll try to write my opinion on it Review After my reading of his stories, some of my GR friends had suggested me to try his plays I earnestly obeyed them with this first play of Chekhov I found once again very similar beauty and charm in it, which had made me his instant admirer, when I d first gone through his wonderful stories There are four main characters in this play TREPLIEFF, a young playwright who thinks he writes different than others He assumes that his themes, though abstract and offbeat, can make wonder.NINA,a young aspiring actress ARKADINA, An old actress mother of TREPLIEFF who feels she still hasacting prowess and charm than that of her younger counterparts.TRIGORIN, A successful writer and main cause of jealousy and conflict of romantic and artistic affairs among TREPLIEFF, NINA and ARKADINA The play depicts the discontent of a young man TREPLIEFF, who sometimes is dominated by the plane human egoism and regrets that his mother is a famous actressIf she were an ordinary woman, I think I would be happier man What could beintolerable and foolish than my position, Uncle, when I find myself the only non entity among a crowd of her guests, all celebrated authors and artistsOn the other hand this young man envies the success of TRIGORIN ,he praises him but tries to diminish his literary achievementsAs for his stories They are how shall I put it Pleasing, full of talent, but if you have read Tolstoi or Zola, you somehow don t enjoy TrigorinPlay progressed wonderfully and kept me engrossed in it.There are existential thoughts in the play and many characters try to find out the purpose of their lives and during such conversation a reader finds the true meaning of this play Sea gull is used symbolically and beautiful indications are shown within the play at different intervals, of this little sea creature This play is all about the artists and their artistic loves, their ambitions and their limitations Characters are doused with ego, self obsession, discontentment, jealousy and passion and their internal emotions and their infringing interests are depicted beautifully by Chekhov

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  3. says:

    Finishing The Seagull, I have now read the quartet of what s known as Chekhov s major plays.The Seagull 1896Uncle Vanya 1897The Three Sisters 1901The Cherry Orchard 1904So I saved the first for last and I think probably the best for last as well But they are all outstanding and I encourage anyone who hasn t read them to give them a try They all came within a few years of the turn of the 20th century, and at that time and place they were as good as it get s And they hold their own today, still Finishing The Seagull, I have now read the quartet of what s known as Chekhov s major plays.The Seagull 1896Uncle Vanya 1897The Three Sisters 1901The Cherry Orchard 1904So I saved the first for last and I think probably the best for last as well But they are all outstanding and I encourage anyone who hasn t read them to give them a try They all came within a few years of the turn of the 20th century, and at that time and place they were as good as it get s And they hold their own today, still standing the test of time

  4. says:

    The Seagull, Anton Chekhov 1355 130 1383 128 9643412717 1386 9789643412715 1391 1392 19 1363 96 The Seagull, Anton Chekhov 1355 130 1383 128 9643412717 1386 9789643412715 1391 1392 19 1363 96 1389 123

  5. says:

    I just noticed this is my 100th review Or perhaps it is my 98th if you only count the sober ones unless of course you re using the Alex method, in which case I ve only written two reviews because it s only the drunken ones that count , and so I shall allow myself in light of this occasion to blather away without bothering my head about any forms whatsoever As opposed to the usual Which reminds me of a quote I came across recentlyThe conviction is gradually forcing itself upon me that goo I just noticed this is my 100th review Or perhaps it is my 98th if you only count the sober ones unless of course you re using the Alex method, in which case I ve only written two reviews because it s only the drunken ones that count , and so I shall allow myself in light of this occasion to blather away without bothering my head about any forms whatsoever As opposed to the usual Which reminds me of a quote I came across recentlyThe conviction is gradually forcing itself upon me that good literature is not a question of forms new or old, but of ideas that must pour freely from the author s heart, without his bothering his head about any forms whatsoeverThis quote doesn t actually have a whole lot to do with The Seagull but one of its characters a character whom I didn t even like very much, if I m being honest says it in a soliloquy, which is the only time he seems to say anything interesting But while this play does talk about books and literature and features writers and actors as characters and even contains a play within a play, it is actuallyabout the things that aren t being discussed Because that is sort of how Chekhov rolls, right It is the layering of subtext that fuels the play s energies.And I like that about Chekhov I like that what isn t going on is just as crucial as what is I enjoy the understatedness of the characters interactions with one another and I like that major occurrences are generally played down rather than overdramatized with soap opera music and close ups And theI talk about this play theI wonder if I should ve given it four stars instead of three, but in the end I found myself comparing it to other Chekhov plays and I simply didn t love it as much as I loved, for example, The Cherry Orchard, which ends with a goosebump inducing scene in which a family s beloved cherry orchard is razed before they ve even moved out of the fucking houseThis play just ends with a whiny, self obsessed little twirp doing what he should have done in Act I.Anyway.Treplev isn t the only one who annoyed me His mother Arkadina is a bit of a heartless monster His love interest Nina is kind of a shallow pain in the ass, but she does exhibit some strength and resolve at the end of the play, qualities that redeem her in my eyes But even though some of The Seagull s characters aren t necessarily likeable, they re still fun to read about I mean who doesn t like a heartless monster in a matriarchal role I m going to see this play performed in a couple of weeks by the Huntington Theatre Company and I am looking forward to it Especially to the ending.Also, I think I should probably writedrunken reviews This one was way too sober

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  7. says:

    A young girl grows up on the shores of a lake, as you have She loves the lake as the gulls do, and is as happy and free as they But a man sees her who chances to come that way, and he destroys her out of idleness, as this gull here has been destroyed Nina is a beautiful, young, aspiring actress in love with the author Trigorin who is perhaps only in love with himself How easy it is to be a philosopher on paper, and how difficult in real life.

  8. says:

    March 9, 2009When I read a play, I am always aware of what a limited view I have of the work, knowing that I am seeing a mere skeleton without any flesh, a framework on which must be hung the realization of the work of art thinking that I have truly experienced the play by just reading it is, I think, much like convincing myself that I know a Beethoven symphony simply because I have read the score I have never seen Chekhov s Seagull produced, and that is frustrating I have read about it and March 9, 2009When I read a play, I am always aware of what a limited view I have of the work, knowing that I am seeing a mere skeleton without any flesh, a framework on which must be hung the realization of the work of art thinking that I have truly experienced the play by just reading it is, I think, much like convincing myself that I know a Beethoven symphony simply because I have read the score I have never seen Chekhov s Seagull produced, and that is frustrating I have read about it and can, by my own reading of the play, know that there are important themes present, one of theinteresting being the failure of characters to connect with each other, each loving someone who doesn t love them, each loved by someone they themselves do not love, resolution of these triangles proving to be futile I was eveninterested in the insights into the role and process of writers, the varying ways they see themselves and what they do I wonder which, if any, represents Chekhov s own understandings A movie of the play was made in 1975, but the reviews suggest that it is unsatisfactory I don t know whether to bother watching it.August 28, 2014I turn now to this play, five years after my last reading and my last review, and I post these additional comments in part to demonstrate how a work of literature can create such a different impression at a much later date Here are my current comments Anton Chekhov s play, The Seagull, was first presented in 1896 in St Petersburg, Russia Initially received with disappointment, it was soon viewed as a triumph and one of the author s masterpieces The play features an interesting and varied ensemble of characters and raises fascinating issues for reflection.The play includes a play within a play, one of several allusions to Hamlet In fact, theories of art abound and are articulated by one character after another, although few of the personages seem to listen carefully to one another Several love triangles are also presented, none easily resolved Each person in the play seems to expect something different from life and love Without dwelling on the plot, let me highlight some of the issues that I found most interesting.Most of the characters are unhappy, each in love with someone who does not reciprocate Life is tedious, dull and fretful The sheer banality of life is exquisitely portrayed Each character seeks affirmation from others, trying in various not very successful ways to be loved and, usually, indulged and cared for Life is both mundane and melodramatic Can we live only by turning our lives into productions Is that the only way to make them seem real and meaningful The play of desires and aversions flickers across each life, a kaleidoscope of emotions that speaks to the evanescence and unsatisfactoriness of existence Life is disappointing, and yet each character meets those disappointments and lives on despite them, managing as best they can Treplyov may be the exception Nonetheless, for the others there is courage in the midst of banality, as if persistence in the face of what life brings is meaning enough, or at least all there is Not one of these figures is heroic they are simply people muddling through Each is flawed, each is damaged, each hopes to be cared for and nourished by another Only Dorn seems to be self sufficient, and he seemingly only out of a sense of resignation and endurance Chekhov s view of life is bleak, unflinching, and nonetheless not without a certain compassion His writing is exquisite, both vivid and moving The title reference is to the seagull that Treplyov kills and that becomes a sort of light motif for Nina, whom he loves.Each time I read a play I am once again made aware of how different reading it is from actually experiencing it in production One might compare it to the reading of a musical score in place of hearing music performed There are certainly professionals who can make the synthetic leap necessary to fully appreciating the richness of an artistic work from such a skeletal outline, but I am not one of them The only time I have seen The Seagull produced wasthan fifty years ago at the Loeb Drama Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts I had forgotten this in my comments from five years ago I m am planning to see it again in two weeks at the American Players Theater in Spring Green, Wisconsin, a performance for which I am most eager.Be it noted that I have now changed my rating for this work from the 3 stars of five years ago to 5 stars The play has not changed, but I clearly have

  9. says:

    The Tragedy of Unrequited Love28 September 2013 Russian literature seems to have a very bleak undertone to it, though I must admit that the only Russian authors that I have read are Dostoyevsky and Chekhov, and the only other author that I know of and do intend to read one day is Tolstoy I guess when you are swamped with the plethora of English writers, then writers from other nations really have to stand out to be noticed, but then I suspect that that is also the case in England I am not su The Tragedy of Unrequited Love28 September 2013 Russian literature seems to have a very bleak undertone to it, though I must admit that the only Russian authors that I have read are Dostoyevsky and Chekhov, and the only other author that I know of and do intend to read one day is Tolstoy I guess when you are swamped with the plethora of English writers, then writers from other nations really have to stand out to be noticed, but then I suspect that that is also the case in England I am not sure if Russian literature developed in the same way that English literature developed, but as I have mentioned previously Russia was pretty much thrust into the modern age where as the countries of central Europe gradually developed, and I suspect that this sudden rush had an effect upon the national consciousness Russia never experienced a reformation and at the turn of the 20th century was probably the only country in Europe that operated under a feudal system of government However, ideas had been filtering in for the last hundred years, and revolution was boiling under the surface However, the Seagull is not about revolution or the backwardness of Russia, but rather it is a play about unrequited love that is played out among a group of artists who are trying to define themselves through their art We have a novelist, an actress, and a playwright, and each of them have their own ideas of who they are and their own ideas of how they desire to express themselves The playwright is an interesting character in that his plays are simply non traditional and also play out in the existential role The problem with that is that nobody actually understands what is going on but him, which in a way leaves him feeling that he has failed as an artist Then there is the idea about unrequited love In this play it is not simply one person pursing another but I believe up to four people who are all pursuing each other, and getting nothing in return Unrequited love is a very painful experience to go through, and I ought to know because I have been through it too many times to count, and it is not simply me pursuing a woman who does not want to return my affections, but being blind to another woman that wants me to show affection to her I guess the other problem is that I am what is known as a hopeless romantic I want romance in a world where romance is dead and only the physical matters Okay, people are still romantic today, but I have in the past got so caught up in a passionate desire for a romantic relationship that I have blinded myself to what is really going on Hollywood has a lot to answer for with regards to unrequited love though because, unlike this play, these love triangles all end up working themselves out Take the Big Bang Theory for instance For two seasons Leonard is chasing Penny but getting nothing in return, and all of the sudden it works out in the third season but not for long, though by the sixth season they are back together again In real life this really does not happen, or at least in my real life this does not happen Instead, I have ended up moping around my house pining for a woman that I can simply never have, yet as I look back on it now I see how foolish I have been In fact, a part of my life I almost felt that I was not complete unless I had a woman to pine over, and in fact the pining wasdesirable than the relationship itself In the end though, I have come to feel content with my singleness , but I still don t know how long that will really last the singleness that is, not the contentment

  10. says:

    Bettie s BooksRe visit here Guest cottage at Melikhovo where Chekhov wrote The SeagullDescription When it opened in St Petersburg in 1896, The Seagull survived only five performances after a disastrous first night Two years later it was revived by Nemirovich Danchenko at the newly founded Moscow Art Theatre with Stanslasky as Trigorin and was an immediate success Checkhov s description of the play was characteristically self mocking A comedy 3F, 6M, four acts, rural scenery a view over a Bettie s BooksRe visit here Guest cottage at Melikhovo where Chekhov wrote The SeagullDescription When it opened in St Petersburg in 1896, The Seagull survived only five performances after a disastrous first night Two years later it was revived by Nemirovich Danchenko at the newly founded Moscow Art Theatre with Stanslasky as Trigorin and was an immediate success Checkhov s description of the play was characteristically self mocking A comedy 3F, 6M, four acts, rural scenery a view over a lake much talk of literature, little action, five bushels of love.The Seagull dramatises the romantic and artistic conflicts between four characters hattip wiki the famous middlebrow story writer Boris Trigorin, the ingenue Nina, the fading actress Irina Arkadinaand her son the symbolist playwright Konstantin Tr plevand Pjotr Nikolayevich Sorin Irina s brother Ilya Afanasyevich Shamrayev a retired lieutenant and the manager of Sorin s estate Polina Andryevna Ilya s wife Masha Ilya and Polina s daughter Yevgeny Sergeyevich Dorn a doctor Semyon Semyonovich Medvedenko a teacher Yakov a hired workman Cook a worker on Sorin s estate Maid a worker on Sorin s estate Watchman a worker on Sorin s estate he carries a warning stick at night

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