➱ The House of the Dead Read ➹ Author Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Truongnguyenwedding.com

The House of the Dead Accused Of Political Subversion As A Young Man, Fyodor Dostoyevsky Was Sentenced To Four Years Of Hard Labor At A Siberian Prison Camp A Horrifying Experience From Which He Developed This Astounding Semi Autobiographical Memoir Of A Man Condemned To Ten Years Of Servitude For Murdering His WifeAs With A Number Of The Author S Other Works, This Profoundly Influential Novel Brilliantly Explores His Characters Thoughts While Probing The Depths Of The Human Soul Describing In Relentless Detail The Physical And Mental Suffering Of The Convicts, Dostoyevsky S Character Never Loses Faith In Human Qualities And The Goodness Of ManA Haunting And Remarkable Work Filled With Wonder And Resignation, The House Of The Dead Ranks Among The Russian Novelist S Greatest Masterpieces Of This Powerful Autobiographical Novel, Tolstoy Wrote, I Know No Better Book In All Modern Literature


10 thoughts on “The House of the Dead

  1. says:

    I have been frequenting an open air restaurant for 7 years now Hiding on the roof of a rickety building, in one of the small tributaries of the Jaipur s busiest road, it is aptly named Cocoon The place is shady, unknown, and visited only by international tourists living in its cheap guest house.Nothing unusual seemed to happen at that place and nothing unusual did happen the last time I visited it I drank two cups of hot lemon tea, I followed short arcs sketched by listless eagles in the even I have been frequenting an open air restaurant for 7 years now Hiding on the roof of a rickety building, in one of the small tributaries of the Jaipur s busiest road, it is aptly named Cocoon The place is shady, unknown, and visited only by international tourists living in its cheap guest house.Nothing unusual seemed to happen at that place and nothing unusual did happen the last time I visited it I drank two cups of hot lemon tea, I followed short arcs sketched by listless eagles in the evening sky, I breathed in volumes of busy city smoke but while leaving for home, as I turned on the ignition key of my bike, I caught hold of a loud, clear, distinct feeling It was so distinct that I did not know at first what it was trying to convey that is to say, my natural thinking process had reverted to a background noise and I could only listen with attention to the wordless outwardly buzz around my ears and inside my chest, which seemed to be growing keener and keener I stood motionless for a second or two, and then, a picture of a shop flashed inside the head I turned my head to find the same shop in the ground floor of that building 7 years and I had never once noticed that shop From across the street, it appeared to be a wholesaler s office, with its glass partition displaying drawing and craft notebooks, paper thin local guides to health and fitness, bedroom life, and tourism in Rajasthan Curious, however, I trudged towards the store, my attention fixed mostly on that outwardly buzz which I wasn t hearing if it can be called hearing for the first time The store was large and largely empty Two men were gossiping in the middle of the room across an unbalanced wooden table, which, helped by either one s dangling feet, made a rhythmic thud thud It stopped abruptly the thud thud, and the the gossiping too, and they looked up surprised to find a visitor I caught their amazed disoriented gaze, but, to avoid any verbal distractions, I looked towards a shelf on my immediate right I was at once stunned.Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, Pasternak, Gibran hard copy editions of rarest of their works, thick with time and grime, casually stacked together in a single shelf With my mouth half open, I plugged out 10 titles, not once leafing through them, not once checking the blurb, and plopped the bulk on the owner s creaking desk.He too was excited but he concealed it, and overcharged me I did not cross check the MRP nor did I request for a discount he may have charged me evenand I would have happily emptied my wallet Such was my state I felt unworldly What did it matter which books I was buying, at what price and who from Trifles Mere trifles What mattered was that I see through the task, witness what I was being shown, stay connected The buzzing humming feeling had now enlarged and transmuted into a quietude donning my whole being not the other way round I returned home after a short ride, but I was now proud for some reason and happy the quietude only a memory, an object for analysis For rationalizations I dusted the books, and arranged them neatly on my desk, as if they were sacred idols I was going to worship every day For 6 months I did not go to them laziness, thoughtlessness, fear The books would change me somehow, I knew, and I wasn t too prepared to let go of whatever they may ask me to let go of No, not unless the sentries of my rational mind were welcoming and unsuspicious And here now I am, reading, having read Something indeed did happen Something unidentifiable But what exactly did the book do So that my intellect does not become restless, I will give it a word to chew over and flaunt Not the same word Leo Tolstoy used for this work edifying not the same word that settled on my mind for Dostoyevsky s influence on an aspiring writer uncorrupting but purging The book purged me, emptied me, humbled me cleaned me of the grime I had gathered over time.This book is sacred


  2. says:

    Souvenirs de Ia maison des morts The House of the Dead, Fyodor Dostoyevsky 1969 1335 432 1341 1366 431 1391 402 978964663821 1394 Souvenirs de Ia maison des morts The House of the Dead, Fyodor Dostoyevsky 1969 1335 432 1341 1366 431 1391 402 978964663821 1394 629 9786001215995 19 1392 424 9789644530388 1341 328 1370 320 1389 390 9789643515294 19


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  4. says:

    Nosotros somos hombres destrozados, triturados, deshechos dec an no tenemos entra as Por eso gritamos de nocheNo existe para m mejor Dostoievski que el autobiogr fico Fue, es y ser el mejor conocedor del alma humana de todos los tiempos , como dec a Zweig pero, para llegar a esa profundidad, le fue necesario empezar con la suya propia y La Casa de los Muertos es un libro en el que el Dostoievski hombre se camufla en el personaje ficticio de Alexander Petrovich para narrar sus penurNosotros somos hombres destrozados, triturados, deshechos dec an no tenemos entra as Por eso gritamos de nocheNo existe para m mejor Dostoievski que el autobiogr fico Fue, es y ser el mejor conocedor del alma humana de todos los tiempos , como dec a Zweig pero, para llegar a esa profundidad, le fue necesario empezar con la suya propia y La Casa de los Muertos es un libro en el que el Dostoievski hombre se camufla en el personaje ficticio de Alexander Petrovich para narrar sus penurias en la prisi n de Siberia La detenci n de Dostoievski en 1849 junto con el grupo revolucionario ut pico de Petrachevsky y el posterior del simulacro de su fusilamiento algo que lo marcar a a fuego y que narrar a magistralmente a trav s de las palabras del Pr ncipe Mishkin en El Idiota derivaron en su posterior reclusi n en Siberia y no iba a ser el mismo Dostoievski el que atravesara el port n de salida cuatro a os despu s.Dice en otra parte del libroAs pues, hab a vivido sin libros, encerrado en m mismo, plante ndome cuestiones, que intentaba resolver, y cuya soluci n me atormentaba frecuentemente Pero jam s podr expresar todo esto Ni l ni ning n otro hombre puede ser mismo en su vida a partir de una experiencia como esta Incluso, Dostoievski afirma que para l era m s dif cil tener que convivir con todo lo que esto conlleva cotidianamente con asesinos, hombres embrutecidos, salvajes y delincuentes, que estar privado de la libertad que gozaba tiempo atr s.Las distintas experiencias vividas en el presidio son contadas en forma frontal, visceral por momentos, pero nunca de a oranza a los viejos tiempos ni de arrepentimiento l fue un hombre que supo aceptar y afrontar las desgracias de su vida con hombr a y sin flaquezas, m s que las f sicas, dado que toda su vida padeci de epilepsia De hecho, tres cap tulos de la segunda parte transcurren en el hospital donde fue internado por esta enfermedad.Otro de los aspectos que Dostoievski desarrolla en profundidad es el de las cadenas y hierros que ten an que soportar sobre el cuerpo los prisioneros, algo que cobra real dimensi n cuando narra la experiencia de cuando deb an ba arse todos juntos en una especie de infierno de vapor y calor intolerable.Tambi n es realmente crudo el modo en que nos cuenta la forma en la que los prisioneros eran azotados en sus espaldas y esto se relacionaba directamente a la gravedad de las penas que cumpl an Estos eran castigados en sus espaldas con varazos que iban de los 500 hasta los 2000 y se hac an en tandas, dado que era normal que el prisionero se desmayara luego de infligirles semejante un castigo tan violento en sus espaldas Otros, directamente no lograban sobrevivir a este suplicio.Cabe destacar tambi n que durante todos los d as estaban sometidos a trabajos forzosos sin misericordia El castigo era la consecuencia irreversible y rec proca que se relacionaba al crimen cometido por el prisionero.La primera parte culmina con dos cap tulos que otorgan cierto alivio a tanto sufrimiento y crudeza y que tratan dos temas comunes a cualquier ser humano, por un lado la Navidad y por el otro, la posibilidad de algunos presidiarios de formar parte de una obra de teatro, lo cual es una manera de liberar tensiones a trav s de un personaje en acto.En l neas generales y m s all de que por momentos ciertos pasajes de lecturas son terribles, es un libro al que le doy cinco estrellas, dado que lo que surge de lo narrado aqu , fue clave que todo admirador de Dostoievsk i y los que quieran conocer sobre su vida pueda comprender esa es la palabra el por qu de muchas de las acciones y vivencias que experimentar n los personajes de sus novelas partir de 1850 y tambi n una prueba de la fortaleza moral y la entereza humana que Dostoievski tuvo que sostener para no sucumbir en la vida


  5. says:

    1984 20 7 2016


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  7. says:

    What I have said of servitude, I again say of imprisonment, we are all prisoners What is our life but a prison We are all imprisoned in an island The world itself to some men is a prison, our narrow seas as so many ditches, and when they have compassed the globe of the earth, they would fain go see what is done in the moonRobert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy S2.3.4Not top half Dostoevsky, but a must read still This book and Dostoevsky s four years in Siberia are an obvious rough drafWhat I have said of servitude, I again say of imprisonment, we are all prisoners What is our life but a prison We are all imprisoned in an island The world itself to some men is a prison, our narrow seas as so many ditches, and when they have compassed the globe of the earth, they would fain go see what is done in the moonRobert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy S2.3.4Not top half Dostoevsky, but a must read still This book and Dostoevsky s four years in Siberia are an obvious rough draft to his later GREAT novels Crime Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, etc Even without the early draft qualities of this novel, Notes from a Dead House is a critical novel This novel IS the godfather of all prison memoir novels Orange might be the new black, but the Big D was there first Actually, it is probably worth a few minutes exploring the similarities between OITNB and Notes from a Dead House Both explore how prison impacts those who are sent there, the way people survive, the things that drive people mad inside, the things that are core about being human within an environment meant to limit the very essence of humanness, how punishment is relative, etc, and ad nauseam I think the brilliance of prison writing is the way it can be used as a microcosm of life We are all trapped by something Nihil enim refert, rerum sis servus an hominum It matters little whether we are enslaved by men or things We are all controlled by something, tortured by someone, addicted to vice, sin, or our own fears Exploring the idea of prison and prisoners can open us up to not just the difficulties we all face, but the way s we can survive life s fetters, our body s constraints, the darkness of this mortal coil Dostoevsky give us hints Dreams, hope, faith, purpose and relationships all allowed him to survive his four years in Siberia Those same characteristics increase the odds that not only will we survive our incarceration on this Earth, but we might even grow fond of it and find beauty and love in the process


  8. says:

    Me ha sorprendido principalmente por no ser tan traum tico como esperaba Y no es que no cuente cosas espantosas de c mo eran las prisiones y los trabajos forzados en Siberia, pero es que Dosto tambi n es capaz de hablar de los presidiarios con cari o y reflejar momentos incre blemente entra ables A n as se me ha hecho largo y denso, una lectura para tomarse con mucha calma.


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